LOT DETAILS
This session is closed for bidding.
Current bid: $18,000 CAD
Bidding History
Paddle # Date Amount

29413 30-Sep-2021 01:15:27 PM $18,000

37967 30-Sep-2021 01:11:44 PM $17,000 AutoBid

29413 30-Sep-2021 01:11:44 PM $16,000

818829 28-Sep-2021 11:19:02 PM $15,000

The bidding history list updated on: Tuesday, October 26, 2021 10:51:49

LOT 003

PC CC
1920 - 2013
Canadian

Study for White Canoe
acrylic and ink on paper
dated 29 Apr 87 and 1 May 87 and inscribed variously and on verso titled and dated on various labels
7 x 5 1/2 in, 17.8 x 14 cm

Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000

Sold for: $22,500

Preview at:

PROVENANCE
Collection of the Artist
Douglas Udell Gallery, Edmonton
Collection of Peggy Marko, Edmonton

LITERATURE
Philip Fry, Alex Colville: Paintings, Prints and Processes, 1983 - 1994, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 1994, page 50, reproduced page 50 and listed page 175 and the 1987 painting entitled White Canoe reproduced page 51 and the studies #701, #70.2, #7.04 and #7.05 listed page 175
Art Gallery of Ontario, Colville, August 23, 2014 - January 4, 2015, traveling in 2015 to the National Gallery of Ontario, the 1987 painting entitled White Canoe reproduced page 115 and listed page 147

EXHIBITED
Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Alex Colville: Paintings, Prints and Processes, September 30, 1994 - January 15, 1995, catalogue #7.03
Art Gallery of Ontario, Colville, August 23, 2014 - January 4, 2015, traveling in 2015 to the National Gallery of Ontario, the 1987 painting entitled White Canoe


There is often an unsettling element to Alex Colville’s images, sensed like an air from our unconscious mind. In Study for White Canoe, the figure’s head is unseen, hidden behind the cross-piece of wood in the front of the canoe. The figure crosses the rock-strewn shore, advancing cautiously to the water bordered by a dark forest. The other person who supports the back half of the canoe is also unseen, although they must surely be there. Sightlines across a grid map out the careful positioning of the figure and canoe. Philip Fry writes, “Each meticulous step taken under the weight of the canoe acquires its meaning from its position on the map; side steps, corrective reorientations, even mistaken turns can lead to revisions of the map…Is this portage not an image of our life, of the moment we realize that the means used to help us progress along the way are as dense with bearing, with significance, as the end to be attained?” This remarkable image emphasizes the path we tread and the trust we need to walk it even though we cannot always see clearly everything ahead of us.


All prices are in Canadian Dollars


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